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Emergency Action Plans

ATSNJ’s Crisis Committee: Here to Help NJ Athletic Trainers Through Tough Times

With the recent increase in catastrophic events during athletic participation, the need for Certified Athletic Trainers has never been higher. Having a qualified health care professional like an Athletic Trainer on the sidelines and available to student athletes is the first step in assuring the health and safety of athletes. With that being said, catastrophic events will continue to happen and Athletic Trainers will continue to be the first individuals to respond. These events can have a major effect on the psychological health of the athlete, parents, teammates, coaches and the responding Athletic Trainer. Having this in mind, the Athletic Trainers’ Society of New Jersey has created a Crisis Committee whose mandate is to help Athletic Trainers within New Jersey cope with catastrophic events.
 
The Crisis Committee is composed of Certified Athletic Trainers who have been trained in Psychological First Aid, Post Traumatic Stress Management and Critical Incident Stress Management.  Currently the team members provide peer-to -peer support for athletic trainers who have been involved with a critical incident, emergency or extenuating event. 
 

Study Calls for More Access to On-site Athletic Trainers to Properly Assess Injuries

Basketball is a popular high school sport in the United States with 1 million participants annually. A recently published study by researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital is the first to compare and describe the occurrence and distribution patterns of basketball-related injuries treated in emergency departments and the high school athletic training setting among adolescents and teens.
 
The study, published online in the Journal of Athletic Training, examined data relating to adolescents 13-19 years of age who were treated in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) from 2005 through 2010 and those treated in the high school athletic training setting during the 2005-2006 through the 2010-2011 academic years for an injury associated with basketball. Nationally, 1,514,957 patients with basketball-related injuries were treated in EDs and 1,064,551 were treated in the athletic training setting.
 
The study found that in general, injuries that are more easily diagnosed and treated, such as sprains/strains, were more likely to be treated onsite by an athletic trainer while more serious injuries, such as fractures, that require more extensive diagnostic and treatment procedures were more commonly treated in an ED.
 

2014 Boston Marathon Athletic Trainers Just Did Their Jobs

Greg M. Cooper/USA TODAY Sports Medical workers help U.S. runner Shalane Flanagan after crossing the finish line during the 2014 Boston Marathon.

What they wanted Monday wasn't all that different from what the 36,000 people running toward them wanted. The 230 athletic trainers and their students working at the Boston Marathon yearned to finish the race and to do their best.

 

Montclair State University Athletic Training Student Saves a Life

March was Athletic Training Month. The theme of the year is "We’ve Got Your Back." On Thursday, March 20, 2014, senior Athletic Training Education Program student Valentina Glavan took the National Athletic Trainers’ Association slogan literally.
 
While eating lunch, Montclair State University Assistant Athletic Trainer Joe Savoia started to choke on his sandwich. At first everyone thought he was joking around or trying to create an emergency situation for the students to respond to. Unfortunately, the episode was all too real.
 
Glavan was nearby and immediately stepped in. She gave Savoia five back blows with no results. He was still choking and getting very anxious. With no hesitation she then applied abdominal thrusts. On the fourth attempt a clump of food shot out of his mouth.
 
According to Glavan, “the main thing this experience has taught me is that you really never know what's going to happen at any time. Sometimes the things we learn in class, the things we really need to know can get a little tedious and repetitious. We spent a whole semester on Emergency Care and sometimes you think to yourself that ‘it can't happen to me’ but it can – it did."

March 19 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Have you practiced your emergency action plans for a cardiac emergency recently?

You should be preapred at all time for such an emergency, as they can happen : Soccer Star Suffers Heart Attack http://www.registerguard.com/web/sports/27784909-41/muamba-players-attack-bolton-chest.html.csp

To read more about sudden cardaic death emergency planning visit: http://atsnj.org/tags/cardiac

 

Ewing High School Receives National Athletic Trainers’ Association Safe Sports School Award

(L to R): Bud Kowal (Athletic Director, David Csillan, (Athletic Trainer) and Dr. Rodney Logan (Principal) from Ewing High School, proudly display the NATA Safe Sports School Award. Ewing High School was the first in New Jersey to be recognized with this award.

Ewing High School’s Athletic Department was recently honored as a recipient of the National Athletic Trainer’s Association (NATA) Safe Sports School Award. This prestigious award champions safety and recognizes secondary schools that provide the safest environments for student-athletes. The award reinforces the importance of providing the best level of care, injury prevention and treatment. Ewing High School is the first school in New Jersey to receive this recognition.
 
                “Ewing High School is honored to receive this recognition from the NATA. It is a testament to the high quality of care provided by our athletic trainer, Dave Csillan, and our coaches,” Ewing High School Athletic Director Bud Kowal stated. “Our goal is always to keep our student-athletes safe during physical education classes, team practices and games so they can accomplish their own goals of great competition, winning records, fair sportsmanship and good health.”
 
                In order to achieve Safe Sports School status, athletic programs must demonstrate they do the following:
 
·         Create a positive athletic health care administration system
·         Provide or coordinate pre-participation physical examinations
·         Promote safe and appropriate practice and competition facilities
·         Plan for selection, fit, function and proper maintenance of athletic equipment
·         Provide a permanent, appropriately-equipped area to evaluate and treat injured athletes

March 7 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

 

Educating parents and coaches on how to help children avoid common sports-related injuries is a top priority for certified athletic trainers who specialize in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses.

The Athletic Trainers' Society of New Jersey (ATSNJ) have created the following checklist to serve as a guide for parents, coaches, administrators and athletes to assure a safe and healthy environment; reduce the risk of injury or death; and in the event of injury, offer an effective emergency plan of action.

For more information visit: http://atsnj.org/article/atsnj-parenthigh-school-safety-checklist

 

 

March 5 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Prepare Guidelines For Emergency Planning and Management of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Athletics

Sudden cardiac death (SCD) ) is the leading cause of death in young athletes. To manage SCD during athletic practices and competitions, many health-related organizations have issued management guidelines.

In the event of sudden cardiac arrest, the strongest determinate of survival is the time from cardiac arrest to defibrillation. Access to defibrillation within three to five minutes is essential. Each minute lost reduces the chance of survival by approximately 10 percent. Increased training and the practicing of emergency action plans will help rescuers correctly identify sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and prevent critical delays in beginning resuscitation. Sudden cardiac arrest can happen to athletes, officials, team staffs and spectators alike. It’s vital that comprehensive emergency planning, management and preparations are in place to ensure a timely and efficient response to SCA.

To see more information visit: http://atsnj.org/tags/cardiac

 

March 3 -Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Participation in youth sports is at an all-time high. With participation comes sports injuries: 

  • 1 in 5 Emergency Room Visits are result of sports, recreation, or exercise – 3.65 million/yr (CDC)
  • Injuries to children 15 & under, playing the 29 most popular sports in the United States cost the United States public $49 billion/yr (The Consumer Products Safety Council)
  • An athlete’s injury has an effect on his/her parents, coaches, the team, his schooling,  health care professional, teammates

March is National Athletic Training Month.  The ATSNJ recognizes the important role parents, and coaches  play in preventing injuries and because of this the ATSNJ has developed a presentation to assist ensuring sports safety.

To see this presentation visit: http://www.atsnj.org/documents/pdf/2010_ATSNJSportsSafetyforCoachesandParents.pdf

 

March 1 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

March is National Athletic Training Month.  The 2014 theme is "We've Got Your Back".

  • An estimated 1.4 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits, and 30,000 hospitalizations occur annually among U.S. high school student athletes participating in practices or competitions in 2006, according to the Center for Disease Control.
  • 62% of sports related injuries occur during practices, according to Safe Kids USA
  • 75 % of all school-related spinal cord injuries occur during sports activities according to a 2007 study by the American Academy of Neurology.
  • 15% of high school sports injuries were classified as severe by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons according to a 2008 study
  • More than 5% of high school athletes are concussed each year from collision and contact sports according Journal of Athletic Training
  • 41% of concussed high school athletes returned to competition too soon according to the American Academy of Neurology

Athletic trainers are highly skilled licensed health care professionals who work under the direction of physicians and are uniquely qualified to specialize in providing health care to the physically active population.  

For more information on how  "We've Got Your Back", visit:  http://atsnj.org/page/Information-about-athletic-trainers

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