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Emergency Action Plans

Two New Jersey Athletic Trainers Team Up to Save the Life of a Spectator

                On January 30, 2015, David Csillan, Head Athletic Trainer with Ewing High School and Tammy Osterhout, Assistant Athletic Trainer with Rancocas Valley High School were taking in their respective team’s game at the Jeff Coney Classic Tournament. David decided to travel to the game that night, which is not something he ordinarily does. Tammy was working the game as the host site Athletic Trainer. Following the game, Ewing High School Athletic Director Bud Kowal ran into the Blue Devils’ locker room. He told Csillan that he was needed in the stands.
 
                Upon arrival, Mr. Csillan found an elderly gentleman lying on his back and lodged between the bleachers. Those spectators who were around the man informed David that the spectator had suffered a seizure. David instructed Mr. Kowal to inform Ms. Osterhout of the situation has he performed his initial evaluation. Mr. Csillan noticed that the individual was breathing and moving his head a small amount. As Ms. Osterhout made her way to the location of the incident, Mr. Csillan supported the victims head. Ms. Osterhout arrived within seconds of being summoned and the two Athletic Trainers determined that the victim needed to be moved from his location in the bleachers to the court. With assistance from those around them, the victim was picked up and brought down to the court.
 

Eric LeGrand to speak at ATSNJ Annual Conference

The ATSNJ is proud to announce that this year's Keynote Lecture at the Annual Conference on March 2nd will feature former Rutgers football player Eric LeGrand, Rutgers Team Physician Dr. Robert Monaco, and Rutgers Athletic Trainer David McCune.

In October 2010, Rutgers University football star, Eric LeGrand, sustained a spinal cord injury at his C3 and C4 vertebrae during a fourth quarter play at MetLife Stadium. While the initial prognosis was grim, Eric demonstrated his titan strength by shattering all expectations for his recovery and rehabilitation. However, recovery was not enough.

With close to six million Americans living with some form of paralysis, including 1.3 million spinal cord injuries, Eric harnessed the national spotlight he attracted from his injury to give back to the community and inspire those living with and impacted by paralysis to bELieve.

 

Please click to read more about this exciting Keynote Lecture.

Preventing Winter Youth Sports Injuries

Traumatic and overuse injuries are on the rise among young athletes. According to Safe Kids Worldwide, 1.24 million kids were seen in emergency rooms for sports injuries in 2013. These injuries can be attributed to a number of reasons: students competing for a top spot on the roster, pushing to get college scholarships, not knowing their physical limits or challenging themselves for a chance to go pro. Every young athlete has a different reason for why they push themselves and, consequently, why they get injured. However, there’s also an underlying similarity: many of these injuries can be prevented. As we get deeper into the winter sports season, it is important for student athletes, parents and coaches to be proactive about learning the common injuries caused by winter sports, and the key steps to preventing those injuries.
 
First, let’s take a look at the common injuries. There are two types of injuries that typically occur: traumatic injuries are the result of a single, traumatic event, and overuse injuries are more subtle and occur over time. Both types can have short and long-term effects on an athlete, and on their ability to perform. The most common injuries among young athletes involve sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures. Winter sports in particular, such as basketball, hockey and skiing, put a lot of stress on the body, which can lead to additional injuries.
 

Athletic Trainer and Police Officer Team Up To Save A Life

Quick action by a East Hanover township police officer and an athletic trainer helped save the life of a 16-year-old who went into cardiac arrest during a high school basketball game Saturday afternoon.

It was while Morris Knolls boys' basketball team was away at Hanover Park High School when a 16-year-old boy passed out on the court, East Hanover Sgt. Jack Ambrose said.

Patrol Officer Mariusz "Mario" Zamojski, a seven-year member of the police department, and athletic trainer Joe Frasciello, who works for Sportscare Performance Institute in Whippany, immediately rushed over to assess the Morris Knolls student, Ambrose said.

Zamojski told NJ Advance Media the student was taking a foul shot "when he appeared to go rigid and just fell backwards against the court." The student fell hard, he said, with his head bouncing off the court.

The boy was unresponsive, wasn't breathing and didn't have a pulse, so Zamojski and Frasciello began to perform CPR, Ambrose said.

After three rounds of chest compressions and rescue breaths, Frasciello and Zamojski hooked the boy up to an automatic defibrillator. But, there was a complication.

About a hundred or so people were in the bleachers including the boy's parents, so the scene was loud and "chaotic," Zamojski said, making it hard for them to hear when the device was ready to shock the boy.

"I'm glad no one was touching the boy's body," he said.

After one shock, the boy started breathing again.

Seton Hall University Athletic Training Student Speaks to Local High School About Perseverance and the Importance of Athletic Trainers

On Thursday, November 20, 2014, Athletic Training Student Cory Weissman told his story to the students at Oratory Preparatory School in Summit, New Jersey. Cory, a stand out basketball player in high school, suffered a stroke after his freshman basketball season at Gettysburg College that left. His story has been highlighted by ESPN College Game Day and ESPN Outside the Lines. A full length motion picture entitled “1000 to 1:  The Cory Weissman Story” was also produced.

Cory’s message to the Oratory Prep students, faculty and staff was simple:  Don’t ever give up on your dreams and concentrate on taking the first step toward your ultimate goals. The stroke that Cory suffered came during a weight lifting session during the off season. Cory described getting a piercing headache that did not subside after 10 or so minutes and he decided to continue with the workout. He said he went to lift a dumbbell off the rack with his right arm and had no difficulty. He went to do the same with his left and could not lift the weight. Over the next few minutes, Cory’s body began to shut down and he and his teammate made their way towards the Athletic Training Room. His friend began yelling for help when an Athletic Trainer emerged from the room and ran to their aid.

“The Athletic Trainer immediately began an assessment and called 911.” Cory recalled.  “She helped save my life. Without her help, who knows what would have happened.”

Pascack Hills Student Pushes for New State School Mandate for Cardiac Emergencies

One teenager from Pascack Hills High School provided powerful testimony in Lodi on Tuesday on the importance of a new state mandate that requires high school staff and students be equipped and trained in life-saving techniques in the event of cardiac emergencies.

“I know that I’m standing here today because of an AED machine and individuals who were properly trained,” Anthony Cortazzo said of the automated external defibrillator.

Cortazzo, now a senior at the high school in Montvale, was at track practice in March when he collapsed and went into sudden cardiac arrest. Others on the field began to administer cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and Steve Papa, athletic trainer at the school, rushed to the field with an AED.

By the time an ambulance arrived, Cortazzo had a pulse and was breathing. Papa credits the “chain of survival” established at the school with the happy outcome.

Cortazzo suffered from a previously undetected congenital heart defect and soon underwent open heart surgery. He has been gaining strength since and plans to return to the football field in the next couple of weeks.

His story and others like it are rare but not uncommon, experts say, and have prompted the new legislation, which went into effect in September.

Every K-12 school in New Jersey is required to have at least one AED and staff trained in how to use it and perform CPR. A second law also requires high school students to be trained in CPR and AED use.

Ranney School (Tinton Falls, NJ) Awarded NATA Safe Sports School 1st Team Award

Ranney School’s athletic program is starting the school-year on an impressive note, being named the fourth school in New Jersey to receive the Safe Sports School Award from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA). The award is given to schools that have outlined specific actions that will lead an already existing athletic program to the highest safety standard for its players.

Ranney School earned a 1st Team Award, which is given to schools that act on all of the recommended and required elements for safety standards (2nd Team Awards are granted to schools that have completed only the required elements; see more details below). “The health and well-being of our students is our priority in the Athletic Department,” says Ranney’s Athletic Trainer Neila Buday, LAT. “This award provides great affirmation for our school. We have the people, policies and protocols in place to provide the safest environment for our student–athletes.” Ranney received a banner of recognition for its 1st Team Award, which will soon be on display on campus.

Oratory Prep School (Summit, NJ) Awarded NATA Safe Sports School 1st Team Award

Oratory Prep is the recipient of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Safe Sports School award for its sports medicine program. The award champions safety and recognizes secondary schools that provide safe environments for student athletes. The award reinforces the importance of providing the best level of care, injury prevention and treatment.
 
“Oratory Prep is honored to receive this 1st Team recognition from NATA, and we remain committed to keeping our student athletes safe during physical education classes, team practices and games so they can accomplish their own goals of great competition, winning records, fair sportsmanship and good health. Our goal is to lead our athletics program to the highest safety standards for our players,” said Mr. Bob Costello, Head of School at Oratory.
 
Physical activity is very important for our youth, according to NATA president Jim Thornton, MS, ATC, CES. “There has been an increase in competitive sports, which are, unfortunately, not without risk. Brain injury/concussion, cardiac arrest, heat illness, exertional sickling, cervical spine fractures and other injuries and illnesses are potentially life-threatening.” Proper planning with proper equipment and personnel is vital to the safety of student athletes today, he notes.
 
"Receiving this award is truly an honor." Said Oratory Prep Head Athletic Trainer Allan Parsells. "The Athletics Department as a whole works so diligently to keep our student-athletes safe and this award recognizes that fact."
 

ASNJ Hall of Fame Member Dave Csillan Quoted in the article "NFL, College and High School Football Training Camps Combat Heat"

As football teams practice diligently for the long season ahead, they must first plan ways to beat the heat of August.
 
Training camp for the National Football League is in full swing as all 32 teams have begun practice sessions. Starting this month, collegiate and high school athletes will each begin practicing for their upcoming seasons.
 
While this summer has featured cooler weather in much of the country, as well as extreme heat in the Northwest, those conditions are likely to change in August. In the Southwest, no significant change is forecast.
 
"A shift in the jet stream is forecast during the middle of August that will lead to longer-lasting warm weather over much of the eastern two-thirds of the nation and less extreme heat over the Northwest," AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski reported.
 
Heat stroke is a major issue for athletes, particularly in high school athletics where one third of schools do not have an athletic trainer on staff, Douglas Casa, chief operating officer at the Korey Stringer Institute at the University of Connecticut, previously told AccuWeather.com.
 
Korey Stringer was a Pro Bowl offensive lineman for the Minnesota Vikings, who passed away in training camp in 2001, after suffering exertional heat stroke.
 

ATSNJ’s Crisis Committee: Here to Help NJ Athletic Trainers Through Tough Times

With the recent increase in catastrophic events during athletic participation, the need for Certified Athletic Trainers has never been higher. Having a qualified health care professional like an Athletic Trainer on the sidelines and available to student athletes is the first step in assuring the health and safety of athletes. With that being said, catastrophic events will continue to happen and Athletic Trainers will continue to be the first individuals to respond. These events can have a major effect on the psychological health of the athlete, parents, teammates, coaches and the responding Athletic Trainer. Having this in mind, the Athletic Trainers’ Society of New Jersey has created a Crisis Committee whose mandate is to help Athletic Trainers within New Jersey cope with catastrophic events.
 
The Crisis Committee is composed of Certified Athletic Trainers who have been trained in Psychological First Aid, Post Traumatic Stress Management and Critical Incident Stress Management.  Currently the team members provide peer-to -peer support for athletic trainers who have been involved with a critical incident, emergency or extenuating event. 
 

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