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Emergency Action Plans

Pascack Hills Student Pushes for New State School Mandate for Cardiac Emergencies

One teenager from Pascack Hills High School provided powerful testimony in Lodi on Tuesday on the importance of a new state mandate that requires high school staff and students be equipped and trained in life-saving techniques in the event of cardiac emergencies.
 
“I know that I’m standing here today because of an AED machine and individuals who were properly trained,” Anthony Cortazzo said of the automated external defibrillator.
 
Cortazzo, now a senior at the high school in Montvale, was at track practice in March when he collapsed and went into sudden cardiac arrest. Others on the field began to administer cardio-pulmonary resuscitation and Steve Papa, athletic trainer at the school, rushed to the field with an AED.
 
By the time an ambulance arrived, Cortazzo had a pulse and was breathing. Papa credits the “chain of survival” established at the school with the happy outcome.
 
Cortazzo suffered from a previously undetected congenital heart defect and soon underwent open heart surgery. He has been gaining strength since and plans to return to the football field in the next couple of weeks.
 
His story and others like it are rare but not uncommon, experts say, and have prompted the new legislation, which went into effect in September.
 
Every K-12 school in New Jersey is required to have at least one AED and staff trained in how to use it and perform CPR. A second law also requires high school students to be trained in CPR and AED use.
 

Ranney School (Tinton Falls, NJ) Awarded NATA Safe Sports School 1st Team Award

Ranney School’s athletic program is starting the school-year on an impressive note, being named the fourth school in New Jersey to receive the Safe Sports School Award from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA). The award is given to schools that have outlined specific actions that will lead an already existing athletic program to the highest safety standard for its players.

Ranney School earned a 1st Team Award, which is given to schools that act on all of the recommended and required elements for safety standards (2nd Team Awards are granted to schools that have completed only the required elements; see more details below). “The health and well-being of our students is our priority in the Athletic Department,” says Ranney’s Athletic Trainer Neila Buday, LAT. “This award provides great affirmation for our school. We have the people, policies and protocols in place to provide the safest environment for our student–athletes.” Ranney received a banner of recognition for its 1st Team Award, which will soon be on display on campus.

Oratory Prep School (Summit, NJ) Awarded NATA Safe Sports School 1st Team Award

Oratory Prep is the recipient of the National Athletic Trainers’ Association Safe Sports School award for its sports medicine program. The award champions safety and recognizes secondary schools that provide safe environments for student athletes. The award reinforces the importance of providing the best level of care, injury prevention and treatment.
 
“Oratory Prep is honored to receive this 1st Team recognition from NATA, and we remain committed to keeping our student athletes safe during physical education classes, team practices and games so they can accomplish their own goals of great competition, winning records, fair sportsmanship and good health. Our goal is to lead our athletics program to the highest safety standards for our players,” said Mr. Bob Costello, Head of School at Oratory.
 
Physical activity is very important for our youth, according to NATA president Jim Thornton, MS, ATC, CES. “There has been an increase in competitive sports, which are, unfortunately, not without risk. Brain injury/concussion, cardiac arrest, heat illness, exertional sickling, cervical spine fractures and other injuries and illnesses are potentially life-threatening.” Proper planning with proper equipment and personnel is vital to the safety of student athletes today, he notes.
 
"Receiving this award is truly an honor." Said Oratory Prep Head Athletic Trainer Allan Parsells. "The Athletics Department as a whole works so diligently to keep our student-athletes safe and this award recognizes that fact."
 

ASNJ Hall of Fame Member Dave Csillan Quoted in the article "NFL, College and High School Football Training Camps Combat Heat"

As football teams practice diligently for the long season ahead, they must first plan ways to beat the heat of August.
 
Training camp for the National Football League is in full swing as all 32 teams have begun practice sessions. Starting this month, collegiate and high school athletes will each begin practicing for their upcoming seasons.
 
While this summer has featured cooler weather in much of the country, as well as extreme heat in the Northwest, those conditions are likely to change in August. In the Southwest, no significant change is forecast.
 
"A shift in the jet stream is forecast during the middle of August that will lead to longer-lasting warm weather over much of the eastern two-thirds of the nation and less extreme heat over the Northwest," AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski reported.
 
Heat stroke is a major issue for athletes, particularly in high school athletics where one third of schools do not have an athletic trainer on staff, Douglas Casa, chief operating officer at the Korey Stringer Institute at the University of Connecticut, previously told AccuWeather.com.
 
Korey Stringer was a Pro Bowl offensive lineman for the Minnesota Vikings, who passed away in training camp in 2001, after suffering exertional heat stroke.
 

ATSNJ’s Crisis Committee: Here to Help NJ Athletic Trainers Through Tough Times

With the recent increase in catastrophic events during athletic participation, the need for Certified Athletic Trainers has never been higher. Having a qualified health care professional like an Athletic Trainer on the sidelines and available to student athletes is the first step in assuring the health and safety of athletes. With that being said, catastrophic events will continue to happen and Athletic Trainers will continue to be the first individuals to respond. These events can have a major effect on the psychological health of the athlete, parents, teammates, coaches and the responding Athletic Trainer. Having this in mind, the Athletic Trainers’ Society of New Jersey has created a Crisis Committee whose mandate is to help Athletic Trainers within New Jersey cope with catastrophic events.
 
The Crisis Committee is composed of Certified Athletic Trainers who have been trained in Psychological First Aid, Post Traumatic Stress Management and Critical Incident Stress Management.  Currently the team members provide peer-to -peer support for athletic trainers who have been involved with a critical incident, emergency or extenuating event. 
 

Study Calls for More Access to On-site Athletic Trainers to Properly Assess Injuries

Basketball is a popular high school sport in the United States with 1 million participants annually. A recently published study by researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children's Hospital is the first to compare and describe the occurrence and distribution patterns of basketball-related injuries treated in emergency departments and the high school athletic training setting among adolescents and teens.
 
The study, published online in the Journal of Athletic Training, examined data relating to adolescents 13-19 years of age who were treated in U.S. emergency departments (EDs) from 2005 through 2010 and those treated in the high school athletic training setting during the 2005-2006 through the 2010-2011 academic years for an injury associated with basketball. Nationally, 1,514,957 patients with basketball-related injuries were treated in EDs and 1,064,551 were treated in the athletic training setting.
 
The study found that in general, injuries that are more easily diagnosed and treated, such as sprains/strains, were more likely to be treated onsite by an athletic trainer while more serious injuries, such as fractures, that require more extensive diagnostic and treatment procedures were more commonly treated in an ED.
 

2014 Boston Marathon Athletic Trainers Just Did Their Jobs

Greg M. Cooper/USA TODAY Sports Medical workers help U.S. runner Shalane Flanagan after crossing the finish line during the 2014 Boston Marathon.

What they wanted Monday wasn't all that different from what the 36,000 people running toward them wanted. The 230 athletic trainers and their students working at the Boston Marathon yearned to finish the race and to do their best.

 

Montclair State University Athletic Training Student Saves a Life

March was Athletic Training Month. The theme of the year is "We’ve Got Your Back." On Thursday, March 20, 2014, senior Athletic Training Education Program student Valentina Glavan took the National Athletic Trainers’ Association slogan literally.
 
While eating lunch, Montclair State University Assistant Athletic Trainer Joe Savoia started to choke on his sandwich. At first everyone thought he was joking around or trying to create an emergency situation for the students to respond to. Unfortunately, the episode was all too real.
 
Glavan was nearby and immediately stepped in. She gave Savoia five back blows with no results. He was still choking and getting very anxious. With no hesitation she then applied abdominal thrusts. On the fourth attempt a clump of food shot out of his mouth.
 
According to Glavan, “the main thing this experience has taught me is that you really never know what's going to happen at any time. Sometimes the things we learn in class, the things we really need to know can get a little tedious and repetitious. We spent a whole semester on Emergency Care and sometimes you think to yourself that ‘it can't happen to me’ but it can – it did."

March 19 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Have you practiced your emergency action plans for a cardiac emergency recently?

You should be preapred at all time for such an emergency, as they can happen : Soccer Star Suffers Heart Attack http://www.registerguard.com/web/sports/27784909-41/muamba-players-attack-bolton-chest.html.csp

To read more about sudden cardaic death emergency planning visit: http://atsnj.org/tags/cardiac

 

Ewing High School Receives National Athletic Trainers’ Association Safe Sports School Award

(L to R): Bud Kowal (Athletic Director, David Csillan, (Athletic Trainer) and Dr. Rodney Logan (Principal) from Ewing High School, proudly display the NATA Safe Sports School Award. Ewing High School was the first in New Jersey to be recognized with this award.

Ewing High School’s Athletic Department was recently honored as a recipient of the National Athletic Trainer’s Association (NATA) Safe Sports School Award. This prestigious award champions safety and recognizes secondary schools that provide the safest environments for student-athletes. The award reinforces the importance of providing the best level of care, injury prevention and treatment. Ewing High School is the first school in New Jersey to receive this recognition.
 
                “Ewing High School is honored to receive this recognition from the NATA. It is a testament to the high quality of care provided by our athletic trainer, Dave Csillan, and our coaches,” Ewing High School Athletic Director Bud Kowal stated. “Our goal is always to keep our student-athletes safe during physical education classes, team practices and games so they can accomplish their own goals of great competition, winning records, fair sportsmanship and good health.”
 
                In order to achieve Safe Sports School status, athletic programs must demonstrate they do the following:
 
·         Create a positive athletic health care administration system
·         Provide or coordinate pre-participation physical examinations
·         Promote safe and appropriate practice and competition facilities
·         Plan for selection, fit, function and proper maintenance of athletic equipment
·         Provide a permanent, appropriately-equipped area to evaluate and treat injured athletes

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