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Emergency Action Plans

March 19 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Have you practiced your emergency action plans for a cardiac emergency recently?

You should be preapred at all time for such an emergency, as they can happen : Soccer Star Suffers Heart Attack http://www.registerguard.com/web/sports/27784909-41/muamba-players-attack-bolton-chest.html.csp

To read more about sudden cardaic death emergency planning visit: http://atsnj.org/tags/cardiac

 

March 7 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

 

Educating parents and coaches on how to help children avoid common sports-related injuries is a top priority for certified athletic trainers who specialize in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses.

The Athletic Trainers' Society of New Jersey (ATSNJ) have created the following checklist to serve as a guide for parents, coaches, administrators and athletes to assure a safe and healthy environment; reduce the risk of injury or death; and in the event of injury, offer an effective emergency plan of action.

For more information visit: http://atsnj.org/article/atsnj-parenthigh-school-safety-checklist

 

 

March 5 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Prepare Guidelines For Emergency Planning and Management of Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Athletics

Sudden cardiac death (SCD) ) is the leading cause of death in young athletes. To manage SCD during athletic practices and competitions, many health-related organizations have issued management guidelines.

In the event of sudden cardiac arrest, the strongest determinate of survival is the time from cardiac arrest to defibrillation. Access to defibrillation within three to five minutes is essential. Each minute lost reduces the chance of survival by approximately 10 percent. Increased training and the practicing of emergency action plans will help rescuers correctly identify sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and prevent critical delays in beginning resuscitation. Sudden cardiac arrest can happen to athletes, officials, team staffs and spectators alike. It’s vital that comprehensive emergency planning, management and preparations are in place to ensure a timely and efficient response to SCA.

To see more information visit: http://atsnj.org/tags/cardiac

 

March 3 -Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

Participation in youth sports is at an all-time high. With participation comes sports injuries: 

  • 1 in 5 Emergency Room Visits are result of sports, recreation, or exercise – 3.65 million/yr (CDC)
  • Injuries to children 15 & under, playing the 29 most popular sports in the United States cost the United States public $49 billion/yr (The Consumer Products Safety Council)
  • An athlete’s injury has an effect on his/her parents, coaches, the team, his schooling,  health care professional, teammates

March is National Athletic Training Month.  The ATSNJ recognizes the important role parents, and coaches  play in preventing injuries and because of this the ATSNJ has developed a presentation to assist ensuring sports safety.

To see this presentation visit: http://www.atsnj.org/documents/pdf/2010_ATSNJSportsSafetyforCoachesandParents.pdf

 

March 1 - Athletic Training Month Resource of the Day

March is National Athletic Training Month.  The 2015 theme is "We Prepare, You Perform".

  • An estimated 1.4 million injuries, 500,000 doctor visits, and 30,000 hospitalizations occur annually among U.S. high school student athletes participating in practices or competitions in 2006, according to the Center for Disease Control.
  • 62% of sports related injuries occur during practices, according to Safe Kids USA
  • 75 % of all school-related spinal cord injuries occur during sports activities according to a 2007 study by the American Academy of Neurology.
  • 15% of high school sports injuries were classified as severe by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons according to a 2008 study
  • More than 5% of high school athletes are concussed each year from collision and contact sports according Journal of Athletic Training
  • 41% of concussed high school athletes returned to competition too soon according to the American Academy of Neurology

Athletic trainers are highly skilled licensed health care professionals who work under the direction of physicians and are uniquely qualified to specialize in providing health care to the physically active population.  

For more information on how  "We Prepare, You Perform", visit:  http://atsnj.org/page/Information-about-athletic-trainers

 

Two New Jersey Athletic Trainers Team Up to Save the Life of a Spectator

                On January 30, 2015, David Csillan, Head Athletic Trainer with Ewing High School and Tammy Osterhout, Assistant Athletic Trainer with Rancocas Valley High School were taking in their respective team’s game at the Jeff Coney Classic Tournament. David decided to travel to the game that night, which is not something he ordinarily does. Tammy was working the game as the host site Athletic Trainer. Following the game, Ewing High School Athletic Director Bud Kowal ran into the Blue Devils’ locker room. He told Csillan that he was needed in the stands.
 
                Upon arrival, Mr. Csillan found an elderly gentleman lying on his back and lodged between the bleachers. Those spectators who were around the man informed David that the spectator had suffered a seizure. David instructed Mr. Kowal to inform Ms. Osterhout of the situation has he performed his initial evaluation. Mr. Csillan noticed that the individual was breathing and moving his head a small amount. As Ms. Osterhout made her way to the location of the incident, Mr. Csillan supported the victims head. Ms. Osterhout arrived within seconds of being summoned and the two Athletic Trainers determined that the victim needed to be moved from his location in the bleachers to the court. With assistance from those around them, the victim was picked up and brought down to the court.
 

Eric LeGrand to speak at ATSNJ Annual Conference

The ATSNJ is proud to announce that this year's Keynote Lecture at the Annual Conference on March 2nd will feature former Rutgers football player Eric LeGrand, Rutgers Team Physician Dr. Robert Monaco, and Rutgers Athletic Trainer David McCune.

In October 2010, Rutgers University football star, Eric LeGrand, sustained a spinal cord injury at his C3 and C4 vertebrae during a fourth quarter play at MetLife Stadium. While the initial prognosis was grim, Eric demonstrated his titan strength by shattering all expectations for his recovery and rehabilitation. However, recovery was not enough.

With close to six million Americans living with some form of paralysis, including 1.3 million spinal cord injuries, Eric harnessed the national spotlight he attracted from his injury to give back to the community and inspire those living with and impacted by paralysis to bELieve.

 

Please click to read more about this exciting Keynote Lecture.

Preventing Winter Youth Sports Injuries

Traumatic and overuse injuries are on the rise among young athletes. According to Safe Kids Worldwide, 1.24 million kids were seen in emergency rooms for sports injuries in 2013. These injuries can be attributed to a number of reasons: students competing for a top spot on the roster, pushing to get college scholarships, not knowing their physical limits or challenging themselves for a chance to go pro. Every young athlete has a different reason for why they push themselves and, consequently, why they get injured. However, there’s also an underlying similarity: many of these injuries can be prevented. As we get deeper into the winter sports season, it is important for student athletes, parents and coaches to be proactive about learning the common injuries caused by winter sports, and the key steps to preventing those injuries.
 
First, let’s take a look at the common injuries. There are two types of injuries that typically occur: traumatic injuries are the result of a single, traumatic event, and overuse injuries are more subtle and occur over time. Both types can have short and long-term effects on an athlete, and on their ability to perform. The most common injuries among young athletes involve sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures. Winter sports in particular, such as basketball, hockey and skiing, put a lot of stress on the body, which can lead to additional injuries.
 

Athletic Trainer and Police Officer Team Up To Save A Life

Quick action by a East Hanover township police officer and an athletic trainer helped save the life of a 16-year-old who went into cardiac arrest during a high school basketball game Saturday afternoon.

It was while Morris Knolls boys' basketball team was away at Hanover Park High School when a 16-year-old boy passed out on the court, East Hanover Sgt. Jack Ambrose said.

Patrol Officer Mariusz "Mario" Zamojski, a seven-year member of the police department, and athletic trainer Joe Frasciello, who works for Sportscare Performance Institute in Whippany, immediately rushed over to assess the Morris Knolls student, Ambrose said.

Zamojski told NJ Advance Media the student was taking a foul shot "when he appeared to go rigid and just fell backwards against the court." The student fell hard, he said, with his head bouncing off the court.

The boy was unresponsive, wasn't breathing and didn't have a pulse, so Zamojski and Frasciello began to perform CPR, Ambrose said.

After three rounds of chest compressions and rescue breaths, Frasciello and Zamojski hooked the boy up to an automatic defibrillator. But, there was a complication.

About a hundred or so people were in the bleachers including the boy's parents, so the scene was loud and "chaotic," Zamojski said, making it hard for them to hear when the device was ready to shock the boy.

"I'm glad no one was touching the boy's body," he said.

After one shock, the boy started breathing again.

Seton Hall University Athletic Training Student Speaks to Local High School About Perseverance and the Importance of Athletic Trainers

On Thursday, November 20, 2014, Athletic Training Student Cory Weissman told his story to the students at Oratory Preparatory School in Summit, New Jersey. Cory, a stand out basketball player in high school, suffered a stroke after his freshman basketball season at Gettysburg College that left. His story has been highlighted by ESPN College Game Day and ESPN Outside the Lines. A full length motion picture entitled “1000 to 1:  The Cory Weissman Story” was also produced.

Cory’s message to the Oratory Prep students, faculty and staff was simple:  Don’t ever give up on your dreams and concentrate on taking the first step toward your ultimate goals. The stroke that Cory suffered came during a weight lifting session during the off season. Cory described getting a piercing headache that did not subside after 10 or so minutes and he decided to continue with the workout. He said he went to lift a dumbbell off the rack with his right arm and had no difficulty. He went to do the same with his left and could not lift the weight. Over the next few minutes, Cory’s body began to shut down and he and his teammate made their way towards the Athletic Training Room. His friend began yelling for help when an Athletic Trainer emerged from the room and ran to their aid.

“The Athletic Trainer immediately began an assessment and called 911.” Cory recalled.  “She helped save my life. Without her help, who knows what would have happened.”

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