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Two New Jersey Athletic Trainers Team Up to Save the Life of a Spectator

                On January 30, 2015, David Csillan, Head Athletic Trainer with Ewing High School and Tammy Osterhout, Assistant Athletic Trainer with Rancocas Valley High School were taking in their respective team’s game at the Jeff Coney Classic Tournament. David decided to travel to the game that night, which is not something he ordinarily does. Tammy was working the game as the host site Athletic Trainer. Following the game, Ewing High School Athletic Director Bud Kowal ran into the Blue Devils’ locker room. He told Csillan that he was needed in the stands.
 
                Upon arrival, Mr. Csillan found an elderly gentleman lying on his back and lodged between the bleachers. Those spectators who were around the man informed David that the spectator had suffered a seizure. David instructed Mr. Kowal to inform Ms. Osterhout of the situation has he performed his initial evaluation. Mr. Csillan noticed that the individual was breathing and moving his head a small amount. As Ms. Osterhout made her way to the location of the incident, Mr. Csillan supported the victims head. Ms. Osterhout arrived within seconds of being summoned and the two Athletic Trainers determined that the victim needed to be moved from his location in the bleachers to the court. With assistance from those around them, the victim was picked up and brought down to the court.
 

Washington Twp. High School’s Tanya Dargusch Selected for Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award

Washington Township High School head athletic trainer Tanya Dargusch was chosen by the National Athletic Trainer’s Association (NATA) as one of their 2015 Most Distinguished Athletic Trainer Award winners. Dargusch joins 17 colleagues from across the nation who will be honored with the award this June at the NATA convention in St. Louis.
 
“I have always said Tanya Dargusch is the best athletic trainer in the state of New Jersey, but now I will have to say she is the best in the nation,” WTHS Director of Athletics Kevin Murphy said. “Our school district is proud of Tanya’s efforts on behalf of all our students. She is a professional who consistently goes above and beyond the scope of her job to provide the best care for our student-athletes. We are happy to share this moment with her.”
 

ATSNJ Student Members Volunteer with Habitat for Humanity

On Thursday, January 15th, four ATSNJ student members dedicated their time with Habitat for Humanity of Bergen County to help rebuild a home that was severely damaged by Hurricane Sandy in Little Ferry, New Jersey. At the time that Sandy hit, the home had suffered nearly five feet of sewer water damage in the basement, destroying nearly everything in its path.
 
The students had the opportunity to repaint the basement of the home as well as measure, cut out, and place new sheet rock onto the walls. The students gained incredible knowledge pertaining to the work that goes into building and remodeling homes from experienced contractors who were at the site that day.
 
The damage that was done by Hurricane Sandy was evident from all of the media coverage, but the ability for the students to see it in person gave them an entirely new perspective. When asked to reflect on the day, Maikee Migallos, a senior athletic training student at Montclair State University said: “Even though I was inexperienced with home renovations, the Habitat for Humanity organization was very grateful we were there. The homeowner was very appreciative and that goes to show how even the smallest things make a difference.”
 

ATSNJ Announces Corporate Partnership with IvyRehab

The Athletic Trainers’ Society of New Jersey is proud to announce a Corporate Partnership with IvyRehab! Corporate Partnership is the highest level of partnership with the ATSNJ. “IvyRehab is excited to partner with The Athletic Trainers’ Society of New Jersey,” said IvyRehab COO Mike Sportini.  “IvyRehab has a host of opportunities to offer. It is our goal to be a supportive component to you and your student athletes.”
 
The ATSNJ is very excited to begin what is surely the beginning of a very successful partnership with IvyRehab. Look for their logo and vendor table at the ATSNJ Conference March 1st and 2nd, 2015!
 
For more information on partnering with or sponsoring the ATSNJ, please visit our website at www.atsnj.org

Manasquan High School Athletic Trainer Receives 2015 Gatorade Secondary School Athletic Trainer Award

On Saturday, January 12, 2015, Kevin Hyland, ATC was awarded the 2015 Gatorade Secondary School Athletic Trainer Award. Kevin is the recipient of this award for the National Athletic Trainers’ Association’s District 2. In order to receive the award, an Athletic Trainer must meet the following criteria:

·       Candidate must be an active certified athletic trainer in the year of consideration and a current member of NATA in good standing.

·       Candidate must have a current NPI Number

·       Candidate must be BOC Certified

·       Candidate must be a full-time or part-time employee in the secondary schools for at least one full academic year

Mr. Hyland was nominated by Manasquan High School Athletic Director Ron Kornegay and had 3 letters of recommendation written in support of his nomination by Mr. Rick Coppola (School Principal), Dr. Patrick Buddle, MD (Team Physician) and Ms. Emily Maher (Athletic Training Student).

                  “I am truly honored to receive this award.” Said Hyland. “I feel it is a direct reflection on our school, administration, and community.  The support I receive from them allows our athletic training program to be successful.  Without the support from my administration and community many of our goals would not have been reached.”

How to Overcome Anxiety During Your Sports Injury Recovery

When sports result in a serious injury, athletes not only need to heal physically, but they often struggle to regain confidence. These feelings can influence how they react to the injury, approach recovery and get back to their sport.
Remember that after a sports injury, it’s normal to feel mild apprehension about recovery. It even serves a purpose by providing some protection from re-injury. However, if you feel persistent and intense fear, it can disrupt your return to the sport.
This condition can be complicated and can often result from multiple factors, including:

Preventing Winter Youth Sports Injuries

Traumatic and overuse injuries are on the rise among young athletes. According to Safe Kids Worldwide, 1.24 million kids were seen in emergency rooms for sports injuries in 2013. These injuries can be attributed to a number of reasons: students competing for a top spot on the roster, pushing to get college scholarships, not knowing their physical limits or challenging themselves for a chance to go pro. Every young athlete has a different reason for why they push themselves and, consequently, why they get injured. However, there’s also an underlying similarity: many of these injuries can be prevented. As we get deeper into the winter sports season, it is important for student athletes, parents and coaches to be proactive about learning the common injuries caused by winter sports, and the key steps to preventing those injuries.
 
First, let’s take a look at the common injuries. There are two types of injuries that typically occur: traumatic injuries are the result of a single, traumatic event, and overuse injuries are more subtle and occur over time. Both types can have short and long-term effects on an athlete, and on their ability to perform. The most common injuries among young athletes involve sprains, strains, dislocations and fractures. Winter sports in particular, such as basketball, hockey and skiing, put a lot of stress on the body, which can lead to additional injuries.
 

Why Do Only Some People with Hereditary Heart Disease Experience Symptoms?

As many as 500,000 people in the United States have a heritable and potentially fatal heart disease called hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

The disease can cause irregular heartbeats, heart valve problems, heart failure and, in rare cases, sudden cardiac death in young people. But some people who carry gene mutations that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy never experience symptoms.

A new study helps explain why. For the first time, researchers have found that, in addition to gene mutations, environmental stress plays a key role in development of the disease.

The study, led by senior author Sakthivel Sadayappan, PhD, MBA, of Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, is published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology.

In hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, the heart muscle becomes abnormally thick, making it harder for the heart to pump blood. The disease can cause irregular heartbeats such as atrial fibrillation; obstructed blood flow that can cause shortness of breath, chest pain, dizziness and fainting spells; problems with the mitral valve; an enlarged ventricle (pumping chamber) that reduces the heart’s ability to pump blood; heart failure; and sudden cardiac death. It’s the leading cause of heart-related sudden death in people under age 30, including many athletes. For example, Boston Celtics basketball star Reggie Lewis died at age 27 after collapsing during a practice session.

Athletic Trainer and Police Officer Team Up To Save A Life

Quick action by a East Hanover township police officer and an athletic trainer helped save the life of a 16-year-old who went into cardiac arrest during a high school basketball game Saturday afternoon.

It was while Morris Knolls boys' basketball team was away at Hanover Park High School when a 16-year-old boy passed out on the court, East Hanover Sgt. Jack Ambrose said.

Patrol Officer Mariusz "Mario" Zamojski, a seven-year member of the police department, and athletic trainer Joe Frasciello, who works for Sportscare Performance Institute in Whippany, immediately rushed over to assess the Morris Knolls student, Ambrose said.

Zamojski told NJ Advance Media the student was taking a foul shot "when he appeared to go rigid and just fell backwards against the court." The student fell hard, he said, with his head bouncing off the court.

The boy was unresponsive, wasn't breathing and didn't have a pulse, so Zamojski and Frasciello began to perform CPR, Ambrose said.

After three rounds of chest compressions and rescue breaths, Frasciello and Zamojski hooked the boy up to an automatic defibrillator. But, there was a complication.

About a hundred or so people were in the bleachers including the boy's parents, so the scene was loud and "chaotic," Zamojski said, making it hard for them to hear when the device was ready to shock the boy.

"I'm glad no one was touching the boy's body," he said.

After one shock, the boy started breathing again.

Seton Hall University Athletic Training Student Speaks to Local High School About Perseverance and the Importance of Athletic Trainers

On Thursday, November 20, 2014, Athletic Training Student Cory Weissman told his story to the students at Oratory Preparatory School in Summit, New Jersey. Cory, a stand out basketball player in high school, suffered a stroke after his freshman basketball season at Gettysburg College that left. His story has been highlighted by ESPN College Game Day and ESPN Outside the Lines. A full length motion picture entitled “1000 to 1:  The Cory Weissman Story” was also produced.

Cory’s message to the Oratory Prep students, faculty and staff was simple:  Don’t ever give up on your dreams and concentrate on taking the first step toward your ultimate goals. The stroke that Cory suffered came during a weight lifting session during the off season. Cory described getting a piercing headache that did not subside after 10 or so minutes and he decided to continue with the workout. He said he went to lift a dumbbell off the rack with his right arm and had no difficulty. He went to do the same with his left and could not lift the weight. Over the next few minutes, Cory’s body began to shut down and he and his teammate made their way towards the Athletic Training Room. His friend began yelling for help when an Athletic Trainer emerged from the room and ran to their aid.

“The Athletic Trainer immediately began an assessment and called 911.” Cory recalled.  “She helped save my life. Without her help, who knows what would have happened.”

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